All tagged Nonfiction

The Genius of Marie Kondo’s KonMari Method

Was anyone else skeptical of Marie Kondo’s take on tidying up? I was, but her new Netflix series “Tidying Up” piqued my interest. So, I checked out Marie Kondo’s audiobook, “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up,” on Libby. By the time the introduction was over, I found myself folding laundry Marie Kondo style into little rectangles that stand up on their own. I don’t know what came over me, but the satisfaction of all my clothes lined up in neat, straight rows compelled me to KonMari the rest of my house.

“Calm the F*ck Down” Review

If you read my “The Books I Picked” post for January, you know that “Calm The F*ck Down: How to Control What You Can and Accept What You Can’t so You Can Stop Freaking Out and Get on With Your Life” by Sarah Knight is a tongue-in-cheek guide to accepting the things you cannot change, finding the courage to change the things you can, and using straight up logic to tell the difference. Sounds familiar right? Besides being a nice idea, one that relies on your own powers of logic instead of waiting on the gift of wisdom from a higher being, Knight’s NoWorries Method for calming the f*ck down works. At least it does for me. 

The Only Self-Improvement Book You Need to Read

In Instant Wisdom: 10 Easy Ways to Get Smart Fast, Beth Burgess successfully summarizes most of the self-improvement books that have been published in the last decade in a fun, casual way. As a self-improvement junkie, I definitely recommend Instant Wisdom. From Instant Wisdom, I learned about Socratic questioning as a way to deal with personal issues and make personal decisions. I also appreciate Burgess’s criticism of the Law of Attraction.

Four Ways to Counteract “What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains”

The internet is affecting our memory and concentration, and not in a goodway, according to Nicholas Carr, author of The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains. But for better or worse, the internet is here to stay. So how do we live with technology without sacrificing our brains? In The Shallows, Carr offers a few suggestions, which I’ve outlined in this article along with one suggestion of my own.

'Destroying Their God' by Wallace Jeffs: A Book Review

Destroying Their God: How I Fought My Evil Half-Brother to Save My Children by Wallace Jeffs is a fascinating and moving story of Jeffs’ struggle with FLDS. He is still facing the consequences of leaving the insular FLDS community, and he has an interesting perspective on polygamy. In my review of Destroying Their God, I take a look at the technical merits of the book and delve into the ways Rulon and Warren Jeffs manipulated their followers.

Review of ‘Your Creative Career’ by Anna Sabino

Your Creative Career is not for every gig worker. It’s for creative entrepreneurs as Sabino calls us. Creative entrepreneurs include web designers, handmade product designers, writers, painters, bloggers, vloggers, etc. Your Creative Career by Anna Sabino is part memoir, part self-help book, and part how-to guide written in a stream-of-consciousness style. If you’ve read other books about using your creativity to make money and have a solid grasp of basic business principles like cash flow, you can skip this one, not a whole lot of new information here. But if you’re new to creative entrepreneurship, you'll want to read Your Creative Career because Sabino covers everything you’ll need to know to get started. Although there might not be a whole lot of new how-to information for the rest of us in Your Creative Career, Sabino does share some wisdom worth contemplating.

So You'd Like to Learn More about History, but Reading Isn't Your Thing

In my first post, I said that reading is a privilege that too many of us take for granted. Reading is hard. Like exercise, and most other habits that are good for us, the urge to procrastinate too often prevails. Add to that our overwhelming schedules, and reading never happens. I get it. I do. And I'm not going to sit here and judge you for not reading. There have been points in my life where I've gotten out of the habit of reading for a while, but I always get back to it the same way: by reading children's books. This isn’t some great new idea that I came up with. Many people encourage would-be readers to pick up easy, fun books. Children’s books are entertaining because kids are harsh critics. Reading children's books, whether they are novels or picture books, fiction or nonfiction, is a good way to ease yourself into a reading habit. Give it a try.